J.A.T. template series was designed 2006 by 4bp.de: www.4bp.de, www.oltrogge.ws
Teachers Activity of the Month

The Importance of Seeing Ahead of the Vehicle

Objective:
This is a classroom activity that will demonstrate to drivers how valuable the habit of searching several seconds ahead of the vehicle is to have more time to detect and process information. The average driver is aware of the vehicle’s intended path of travel 3-5 seconds in advance. This demonstration can show the value of looking 20-30 seconds ahead of the vehicle.

Demonstration
Use a three or four D cell adjustable focus flashlight. Turn the flashlight on. Completely darken the room. Shine the flashlight on the front wall while standing three feet away. There will be a bright small circle in the center and a much larger circle of light with less intensity to the outside. The bright inner circle of light is much like the central cone of vision. The larger outer circle is like our peripheral vision. Walk backwards away from the wall while keeping the beam focused on the wall. Call attention to how much larger the field of vision gets when looking farther ahead. Move to the back of the classroom. Demonstrate how much illumination of the room takes place when shining the flashlight to the front wall. This distance to the wall is like looking to your target area which could be 20 or 30 seconds ahead. Then, from the back of the room, shine the beam onto the floor three feet in front of you. Take notice of how reduced the illumination of the room becomes when the beam is lowered. The lowered beam represents a driver looking only 3-5 seconds ahead of the car. You can use the flashlight to show how vision should be used for searching a traffic scene. Shining the light to the front wall is like searching to the target area, which gives you ample opportunity to evaluate the path you intend to travel. Once the path of travel is visualized you can then see if there are any line of sight restrictions, or path of travel changes, which could prevent you from occupying your intended space.

Pevious month

The Use of a Flashlight Demonstrates
The Value of Good Driver Searching Habits

Objective:
This is a classroom activity that will demonstrate to drivers how valuable the habit of searching several seconds ahead of the vehicle is to have more time to detect and process information. The average driver is aware of the vehicle’s intended path of travel 3-5 seconds in advance. This demonstration can show the value of looking 20-30 seconds ahead of the vehicle.

Demonstration
Use a three or four D cell adjustable focus flashlight. Turn the flashlight on. Completely darken the room. Shine the flashlight on the front wall while standing three feet away. There will be a bright small circle in the center and a much larger circle of light with less intensity to the outside. The bright inner circle of light is much like the central cone of vision. The larger outer circle is like our peripheral vision. Walk backwards away from the wall while keeping the beam focused on the wall. Call attention to how much larger the field of vision gets when looking farther ahead. Move to the back of the classroom. Demonstrate how much illumination of the room takes place when shining the flashlight to the front wall. This distance to the wall is like looking to your target area which could be 20 or 30 seconds ahead. Then, from the back of the room, shine the beam onto the floor three feet in front of you. Take notice of how reduced the illumination of the room becomes when the beam is lowered. The lowered beam represents a driver looking only 3-5 seconds ahead of the car. You can use the flashlight to show how vision should be used for searching a traffic scene. Shining the light to the front wall is like searching to the target area, which gives you ample opportunity to evaluate the path you intend to travel. Once the path of travel is visualized you can then see if there are any line of sight restrictions, or path of travel changes, which could prevent you from occupying your intended space.

 

Newsflash

Lane Departure Warning Systems Help Drowsy Drivers Avoid Crashes read more
 
J.A.T. template series was designed 2006 by 4bp.de: www.4bp.de, www.oltrogge.ws